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Monday, August 6, 2007

I Want to Learn

Today I was up at 4.40 am. My shins are still on a break so I did press-ups, lateral squats and leg raises. I wanted it to be a no-sugar day so I started breakfast with Weetabix, roasted groundnuts and hot milk. But I was unprepared. By 9am the office was teeming with tea and snacks and I was yearning for some. So I gave up and had tea and a chapati. I need to read up on maintaining/controlling my blood sugar level and how it impacts on weight loss/gain.

I have a couple of Christians at the office who are re-examining their beliefs and gaining new perspectives. Today, I lent one of them my copy of Michael Shermer's Why People Believe in Weird Things: Pseudoscience, Superstition, and Other Confusions of Our Time. I hope he learns something new. Yesterday, he asked a question on Acts and I was informing him that it was written by more than two hands because it has different accounts of Paul's conversion among other things. He had a question regarding the shift from third person to first person plural and I presented him with Vernon Robbin's By Land and By Sea: The We-Passages and Ancient Sea Voyages and invited him to read it alongside my old post Is the Sea Voyage Genre Theory Shipwrecked?. Last week, we discussed Theodore M Drange's Incompatible-Properties Arguments: A Survey and I could see cognitive dissonance written all over his face. Lets hope his journey is not painful or barren. Letting go of the guardrails we have always leaned on our entire lives and learning to stand on our own, without the warm, assuring belief that we are loved and cared for by a supernatural being can be very difficult.
I just stuck I Want To Learn near my monitor. Recall that Fox Mulder had I Want to Believe at his desk in X-Files. I am currently learning Kikuyu and reading Richard Dawkins' - The Blind Watchmaker: Why the Evidence of Evolution Reveals a Universe Without Design he does a great job of explaining how complex organs evolve from simple ones through cumulative changes and natural selection.

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